The Los Angeles Country Club has withdrawn its application for a 166-foot fence to keep errant golf balls from straying onto a proposed development next door.

The country club withdrew its application at the end of July after the owners of the former Robinson’s-May site, who objected to the fence, said that they would not hold the country club liable for errant golf balls damaging property or injuring people at the proposed development, according to attorneys representing both parties.

The country club operates a 103-year-old golf course straddling Wilshire Boulevard just west of Beverly Hills. The fairway for the 16th hole abuts the property at 9900 Wilshire, where developers are looking to build two luxury condo towers. Claiming fear of liability, the country club applied to the city of Los Angeles for permission to build an 800-foot-long mesh fence up to 166 feet high with the goal of keeping wayward balls from hitting the condos or their occupants.

Last year, two city planning bodies approved the fence. But the condo development company, BH Wilshire International of Coral Gables, Fla., appealed the decisions, arguing that the fence was five times the height allowed by city code and would block the view for prospective condo owners.

The two sides negotiated for more than six months before reaching agreement by the end of July, shortly before Chinese developer Wanda Group announced it was buying the 9900 site from a joint venture led by Hong Kong private equity firm Joint Treasure International.

Check out the Business Journal’s previous coverage of the golf fence dispute:

Also, check out the Business Journal story on Wanda Group’s purchase of the old Robinsons-May site:

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