The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) Foundation has awarded $700,000 in grants to 21 organizations supporting the lives of seniors and people with disabilities through technology. First time grantees include Helen Keller National Center, American Printing House for Blind and Code of Support Foundation.

“During this pandemic, we see the power of innovation in many different facets of life and its impact on a variety of people,” said Steve Ewell, executive director, CTA Foundation. “By recognizing the work of these great organizations, we are strengthening our commitment to the role technology plays in improving the lives of older adults and people with disabilities.”

Established in 2012, the CTA Foundation is a public, national foundation with the mission to link people with disabilities and seniors with technologies to enhance their lives. This year, the Foundation will support the following 21 groups:

• American Printing House for the Blind: The VisionConnect initiative will provide resources for people new to vision loss through an app, website, hotline and other materials.

• Code of Support Foundation: The Foundation’s PATRIOTlink resource database enables services members, veterans, caregivers and social service professionals to identify the benefits and services they are eligible for.

• F.Y.Eye: The digital community advertising platform will enable nonprofits to reach seniors and people with disabilities in New York.

• Institute for Human Centered Design: The institute will support creation of accessible and interactive experiences in the Smithsonian Latino Center’s inaugural exhibition.

• ITNAmerica: The group will support the systems of a national nonprofit transportation network for older adults and people with vision loss.

• Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired: The Access Tech Immersion Pilot program will bring in participants from around California for a multiday immersive training on technology solutions to assist with daily activities.

• Lutheran Services in America: The Remote Caregiver program uses tablets and other technology to help caregivers and older adults in rural communities and promote social connection and independent living.

• Helen Keller National Center: Technology training for professionals working with people who are deaf and blind as well as older adults who are losing their vision and hearing.

• The Filomen M. D’Agostino Greenberg Music School: The music school for the blind offers assistance to everyone from students to recreational singers to professionals using assistive musical technology.

The foundation will continue supporting previous grantees: AARP Foundation, Benetech, Byte Back,CareWheels, Code of Support Foundation, Cyber-Seniors, Front Porch, Easter Seals Greater Houston, MAB Community Services, Oak Hill, Older Adults Technology Services (OATS), South Florida Institute on Aging  and The Arc of the United States.

Riya Anandwala is director of industry communications for the Consumer Technology Association. Learn more at CTA.tech.

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