Homed In: Drew Boyles of El Segundo’s HazAwayToday.com.

Homed In: Drew Boyles of El Segundo’s HazAwayToday.com. Photo by Ringo Chiu.

Throwing away hazardous materials such as old paint cans, batteries and household cleaners is no one’s idea of a fun time, especially for homeowners who must schlep the messy junk to a local collection center.

That’s why co-founders Drew Boyles and Eric Busch last month launched HazAwayToday.com, an El Segundo disposal service.

Boyles said the company is the first to pick up dangerous chemicals, products and other materials directly from people’s homes, making it easier for them to get rid of these substances in an environmentally friendly way.

“I always knew there was this unmet need,” Boyles said. “Customers have said, ‘It’s about time.’ We’ve helped people who had a family member pass and needed to clean their home.”

Customers in Los Angeles and Orange County can call or book the service online and a technician will arrive at the customer’s home within 24 hours of the order. The technician will collect and dispose of the waste and fill out the required government paperwork.

And if you’ve got an old jar filled with suspicious-looking liquid sitting around, technicians can run a test to see if it’s toxic. HazAwayToday charges $1.39 a pound with a minimum charge of $89.

Boyles said the materials are taken to a collection facility in Long Beach.

Disposal of hazardous waste, he explained, is a highly regulated industry. It took three years of research and planning before the company could launch.

“A lot of things had to happen to ensure the regulatory agencies that we had the right procedures and safety protocols in place,” he said.

HazAwayToday has already serviced about 100 residential customers, he said, but it also plans to help small to midsize businesses. An expansion into Northern California and other states is also planned.

“We both care about the environment,” said Boyles. “We need to do more to educate (people because) if they put this in the trash can it is going to end up in a landfill.”

– Subrina Hudson

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