Thomas Jackiewicz

Thomas Jackiewicz

THOMAS E. JACKIEWICZ

Chief Executive

Keck School of Medicine at USC

Thomas Jackiewicz is chief executive of Keck School of Medicine at USC, overseeing three Los Angeles-area hospitals—Keck Hospital at USC, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center and USC Verdugo Hills Hospital—and the USC Care physician practice, which includes more than 40 ambulatory clinics across California. He joined USC in 2012 after serving as chief executive of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Health System and associate vice chancellor of UCSD Health Sciences. Jackiewicz has held leadership roles at the University of Pennsylvania Health System, Stanford University School of Medicine and Columbia University Medical Center. He is on the board of the California Hospital Association and is a member of the Association of American Medical Colleges Advisory Panel for Health Care. He holds a master’s degree in public health from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Georgia.

What was your proudest moment?

My proudest moment is when my wife, Dr. Carol Peden, received the Public Health Innovator Award from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in recognition of her efforts to improve surgical care for patients in the U.K.’s National Health Service (NHS).

What is your alma mater?

University of Georgia (undergraduate) and Columbia University (graduate)

What is your next project?

Preparing Keck Medicine of USC for the disruptions that lie ahead in health care by taking risk through bundled payment agreements with payers and partners; focusing on delivering our patients world-class health care where they want the care delivered; leveraging new technologies to develop a new model of primary care (primary care 3.0); and expanding our partnerships and affiliations.

Who is your hero?

Lyndon B. Johnson, for his inspiring vision for a “Great Society,” for championing the rights of African-Americans and for his commitment to alleviating poverty. His influential legacy includes Medicare and Medicaid, which has changed the lives of countless Americans, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

What do you like best about Los Angeles?

Los Angeles is fantastic, and I love the diversity. The pure optimism of the people here, who want to create a better America, makes me truly hopeful for our future.